No Colour Bar: Black British Art in Action 1960 -1990

Guildhall Art Gallery, City of London, 10 July 2015 to 24 January 2016
Free exhibition and Public programme – Most events are free to attend BOOK TICKETS HERE

No Colour Bar focuses on Black British cultural heritage explored through the lens of the Black Art Movement of the 1960s to the 1990s –a flowering of popular as well as fine art, music, poetry and literature which came out of what were then called Black and Third World migrant-settler communities – African-Caribbean, continental African, Asian and Latin American. The centrepiece of No Colour Bar is the stunning six-month exhibition at Guildhall Art Gallery which takes place from July and followed by a touring exhibition in 2016.

Please note the Guildhall Art Gallery is closed on Friday 22 January during the daytime until 6pm when it reopens for the Late View (6pm-10pm)

John Lyons, Jab Jab, 1988 (C) The Artist.

John Lyons, Jab Jab, 1988 (C) The Artist.

No Colour Bar is FHALMA’s brain child and was created to reach out to wider audiences from within the heart of the London and to connect with communities across the capital and the global Diaspora. With the generous support of the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), No Colour Bar has flourished to become an important milestone in Black British cultural heritage and the arts calendar through the support and close creative collaboration of FHALMA’s partners Guildhall Art Gallery and the London Metropolitan Archives, provided by the City of London Corporation.

Tam Joseph, UK School Report, 1983. (C) Tam Joseph. Image courtesy Museums Sheffield.

Tam Joseph, UK School Report, 1983. (C) Tam Joseph. Image courtesy Museums Sheffield.

Eric Huntley, co-founder of Bogle-L’Ouverture Publications commented: “Bogle-L’Ouverture’s Publishing company’s commitment to Black visual art took us outside the bookshop as we were part of the Caribbean Arts Movement and worked to get the famous Guyanese artist, Aubrey Williams exhibited at the Commonwealth Institute. The period from 1960-1990 in particular saw an explosion of black arts that sought to forge a new identity in Britain, as well as celebrate and preserve specific African and Caribbean elements of our heritage. Our collaboration with John LaRose and Oscar Abrahams at the Keskidee was an important initiative in establishing Britain’s first black, cultural arts centre. It is good to be bringing this important work to the attention of the wider public through this HLF grant.”

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Eric & Jessica Huntley (c) Mervyn Weir

 

Fowokan, Lost Queen of Pernambuco, 1989 (c) The Artist.

Fowokan, Lost Queen of Pernambuco, 1989 (c) The Artist.

In an important programme of initiatives the No Colour Bar project comprises:

  • six month exhibition in 2015, combining art and archives at the Guildhall Art Gallery, London – with works by a range of Black visual arts practitioners including paintings, sculpture, combined with archive objects and artefact.
  • programme of exhibition-related activities – including touring elements of the exhibition to other heritage sites in 2016
  • youth-focused experiences and activities, including a major youth-led intergenerational conference: Mountain High: Archive Deep – the 10th Annual Huntley Conference
  • training for heritage volunteers and two heritage internships related to the work of the exhibition and its public programmes.

No Colour Bar: Black British Art in Action 1960-1990 is a free exhibition and runs from 10 July 2015 until 24 January 2016