No Colour Bar: Black British Art in Action 1960-1990

Guildhall Art Gallery, City of London, 10 July 2015 to 24 January 2016
Free exhibition and 
Public programme – Most events are free to attend BOOK TICKETS HERE

No Colour Bar is an important public art and archives exhibition – in the heart of the City of London – the first of its kind in the UK, combining contemporary fine art and archives featuring the works of seminal Black British artists and historically significant Black activists.

The realisation that Britain was changing forever is no better articulated than through the lens of Jessica and Eric Huntley, pioneers of a movement that nurtured the establishment of Black British culture from the 1960s.  As prominent civil rights campaigners and political activists, through their publishing powerhouse, Bogle-L’Ouverture Publications Limited and their creative hotspot, The Walter Rodney Bookshop, they helped to spawn and inspire dynamic generations of artists, cultural and political leaders – whose stories are collected and celebrated in this stunning and innovative exhibition.

Running for six-months, this extraordinary multi-media exhibition No Colour Bar takes its impetus from the life works of Guyanese born, Jessica and Eric Huntley, both individually highly politically active people and also business partners, whose papers, business and personal, archive materials and collections were deposited in the Huntley Archives at London Metropolitan Archives.

Paul Dash, Self-Portrait, 1972, oil on canvas. (C) The Artist

Paul Dash, Self-Portrait, 1972, oil on canvas. (C) The Artist

Renowned artists including Eddie Chambers, Sonia Boyce MBE, Sokari Douglas-Camp CBE, Denzil Forrester and Chila Kumari Burman are among a group of prominent Black artists with works of art on display, shown for the first time across all media, including sculptures, painting, drawing, illustration, literature and archive photography and film.

Opening to the public on Friday 10 July 2015, the stunning exhibition features a multi-sensory installation of the Bogle-L’Ouverture Walter Rodney Bookshop, recreated by the eminent artist and curator Dr Michael McMillan (West Indian Front Room) and sound and visual specialists, Dubmorphology.

Denzil Forrester, Dub Scratch, 1990, oil on canvas (c) The Artist, Image courtesy Harris Museum and Art Gallery

Denzil Forrester, Dub Scratch, 1990, oil on canvas (c) The Artist, Image courtesy Harris Museum and Art Gallery

No Colour Bar: Black British Art in Action 1960-1990, made possible through generous grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), is a collaboration between the Friends of the Huntley Archives at the LMA (FHALMA), the Guildhall Art Gallery and the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) and supported by the City of London.